PostFestive Favourites Edit

It's beginning to look a little like Christmas...

So we’ve put together a small selection of the pieces we can’t live without this festive season.

We couldn’t decide which party shoe we liked best – Curtain Magic in gunmetal metallic, Always Bright with its asymmetric gold stitching or sassy shoe boot Dalhart Salsa – so we thought we’d take all three. For bags, do we go matchy matchy with Just May or add shimmer with gorgeous oversized clutch, Tissi Nights?

Thank goodness men’s smart stays beautifully simple. Gabwell Walk is utterly sophisticated with its low key deep gleam in premium chestnut leather.

SHOP – Party & Gifts

 

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PostA Week In The Style Of: Dan Hasby-Oliver

We thought it was high time we caught up with Clarks Men’s Trends Analyst, Dan Hasby-Oliver.

As if predicting and formulating colour and material palettes, identifying key shoes and working to influence the wider Clarks Brand community in product creation weren’t enough, Dan puts his journalistic background to good use as author and editor of Last Style of Defense, an award winning, globally ranked menswear blog that features the best in menswear from around the globe.

Just the right man then to give us his style notes for the season.

FRIDAY. One of the biggest – and simplest – shoes for the season is the white cupsole, as it works with everything and has become a wardrobe classic of late. These white, premium leather Balloff Lace are a preview of what’s to come for Spring/Summer 2016 as we really tap into the sneaker trend. There is a superb package around this shoe and a perk of working at Clarks is to get them early! Nodding to the surge in Sport Luxe, it again works well with black jeans and a white, casual button down shirt, which again echoes that Scandinavian look. 

SHOP - Mens Trainers

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PostA Week In The Style Of: Dan Hasby-Oliver

We thought it was high time we caught up with Clarks Men’s Trends Analyst, Dan Hasby-Oliver.

As if predicting and formulating colour and material palettes, identifying key shoes and working to influence the wider Clarks Brand community in product creation weren’t enough, Dan puts his journalistic background to good use as author and editor of Last Style of Defense, an award winning, globally ranked menswear blog that features the best in menswear from around the globe.

Just the right man then to give us his style notes for the season.

THURSDAY. Sport Luxe is no longer a trend but a cultural phenomenon. What started out as the rise of the sneaker as a lifestyle product, rather than just worn for sports or the gym, has now permeated menswear and the wider fashion industry. It can be done in a casual way, or like here, in a more dress way as I've chosen a pair of grey marl sweatpants and teamed them with a white, Oxford shirt and a black double breasted blazer to wear with Edward Limit. The Goodyear Welted construction and superb leather and brogue detail just shout quality and craftsmanship and it's a shoe that can be worn in a variety of ways, taking me from day to night. The contrast of the formality of the shoe and jacket, played down with the sweat pants and a more casual white shirt adds an interesting dynamic that can take me from the office to a bar in Bath or Bristol to meet friends with ease, while giving me the opportunity to tap into a strong and ongoing trend. 

BUY - Edward Limit, Black leather

SHOP - Mens Smart Shoes

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PostA Week In The Style Of: Dan Hasby-Oliver

We thought it was high time we caught up with Clarks Men’s Trends Analyst, Dan Hasby-Oliver.

As if predicting and formulating colour and material palettes, identifying key shoes and working to influence the wider Clarks Brand community in product creation weren’t enough, Dan puts his journalistic background to good use as author and editor of Last Style of Defense, an award winning, globally ranked menswear blog that features the best in menswear from around the globe.

Just the right man then to give us his style notes for the season.

WEDNESDAY. Monochrome. The Scandinavian Look. Or just simply black and white. Simplicity has become a trend in itself yet doesn’t obviously look like one, which is why I chose a simple pair of slim black jeans and a well cut white Oxford shirt to pair with Penton Monk. The Double Monk is a wardrobe essential for any man’s wardrobe, as is a pair of black jeans and a white shirt. It’s a day for classic, staple items that work perfectly together whilst taking style cues from Denmark and Sweden. 

BUY - Penton Monk, Black leather

SHOP - Mens Smart Shoes

 
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PostA Week In The Style Of: Dan Hasby-Oliver

We thought it was high time we caught up with Clarks Men’s Trends Analyst, Dan Hasby-Oliver.

As if predicting and formulating colour and material palettes, identifying key shoes and working to influence the wider Clarks Brand community in product creation weren’t enough, Dan puts his journalistic background to good use as author and editor of Last Style of Defense, an award winning, globally ranked menswear blog that features the best in menswear from around the globe.

Just the right man then to give us his style notes for the season.

TUESDAY. A good pair of crafted, high quality leather, Goodyear Welted shoes should last a man a lifetime. This sentiment is reflected in Edward Limit, a pair of tan brogues that look great teamed with a pair of indigo jeans and a white shirt with a logo sweater on top. That mix of casual and dress is a strong trend that has been bubbling up from the street as it speaks to a busy, creative lifestyle but also nods to an appreciation of quality. Edward Limit is inspired by the Clarks archive; coming from a style named Craftmaster that was born in the 1950s, it shows that quality and style transcends decades but can easily fit into the looks of contemporary menswear.

BUY - Edward Limit, Tan Interest leather

SHOP - Mens Smart Shoes

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PostA Week In The Style Of: Dan Hasby-Oliver

We thought it was high time we caught up with Clarks Men’s Trends Analyst, Dan Hasby-Oliver.

As if predicting and formulating colour and material palettes, identifying key shoes and working to influence the wider Clarks Brand community in product creation weren’t enough, Dan puts his journalistic background to good use as author and editor of Last Style of Defense, an award winning, globally ranked menswear blog that features the best in menswear from around the globe.

Just the right man then to give us his style notes for the season.

MONDAY. The Clarks Desert Boot is the ultimate, versatile dress casual shoe. As both Street – the home of Clarks – and the rolling landscape of Somerset has been swathed in a blanket of fog, pairing them with classic indigo denim mixed with a checked shirt and a warm, duvet-like jacket with fur trimmed hood makes for the ideal early autumn look. The sand suede is the original Clarks Desert Boot shade, which is almost as iconic as the profile itself. It works with a variety of outfits and is a nod to us celebrating the Desert Boot’s 65th anniversary this year.

BUY - Clarks Desert Boot, Sand suede

SHOP - Mens Originals

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PostMade In England – Womens Limited Edition Brogues

Impeccably researched and obsessively crafted. Just two ways we’d describe our Made in England women’s brogues.

Our senior designer Helen Richards Rees combed the Clarks archive to find two classic looks due for reinvention – the Watlington, and Saddle, a style worn by Queen and Princess Elizabeth during a tour of South Africa in 1947. Calling out to 21st century bluestockings everywhere we’ve created a capsule collection that features flashes of metallic and grenadine through to the inky gloss of all black.

We’ve chosen to manufacture our Made In England brogues in Northampton, the spiritual home of British shoemaking. Each shoe is Goodyear Welted meaning each takes 160 steps and eight weeks to make.

Make like preppy princesses Alexa Chung, Sienna Miller and Pixie Lott and wear with tea dresses and cardigans, soft tailoring, or a beautifully cut men’s shirt and jeans. A super-wise wardrobe investment indeed.

SHOP - Made In England Limited Edition Brogues

READ MORE about Made In England Limited Edition Brogues

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PostTales From the Riverbank

Journeying from Japan through street culture, fashion school and Paris, Clarks Senior Designer Atsushi Hasegawa shares stories of collecting vintage vinyl, teaching fly fishing to the French elite and how he finally settled down with a Somerset girl.

Atsushi – can you tell us a little bit about your background, and how you came to work for Clarks? Was there anything in particular that brought you here?

I was born and grew up in Japan where I went to the most famous fashion school, the same school as Yohji Yamamoto and Kenzo. Before fashion school I’d worked in the Vivienne Westwood shop – the first in Japan – and had been in i-D and The Face magazine. It was a very exciting time! Vivienne Westwood re-issued a collection at the shop which included her famous bondage trousers that The Sex Pistols and others were famous for wearing.

Rather than being a good student I started DJ-ing with quite famous, iconic people in Japan. I discovered fashion myself, but not ordinary fashion – more sort of street/sub-culture.  I wasn’t necessarily inspired by art – everything the teacher said, do this, or do that – I hated it. But it was the mid to late 80s and I was completely fascinated by skateboarding, hip-hop – not necessarily Japanese culture. I was totally interested in foreign scenes. Probably London at that time was strongest.

While I was DJ-ing there were many fashion and magazine people around, so I started showing them my sketches and illustrations. I quickly started doing artwork for them, for fashion and street fashion magazines. But then in the mid-90s I had a complete ‘enough’. I’d discovered French fly fishing culture - sometimes even while I was DJ-ing I’d need to go to the countryside to go fishing. So when I stopped DJ-ing I was more interested in this real scene than fashion or trends. I started to work for the American outdoor company, L.L. Bean. I was a fishing instructor for them for four years. And whatever I do I always immerse myself in it. So that’s what happened with fly fishing

 

 

French fly fishing culture is connected with Ernest Hemingway who went to France a couple of times to fish with the French hotelier, Charles Ritz. I contacted the shop they all used to go to in Paris, a really famous shop, La Maison de la Mouche Dubos, and I had a correspondence with Jean Michel Dubos, the son of Rene Dubos, the shop’s founder.

So in the mid-90s I said, ‘OK, I should go!’ And I went to Paris and was there for 15 years. I was a fly fishing instructor for La Maison de la Mouche Dubos, but was still doing design and illustration jobs. I launched a T-shirt brand with a Japanese company and tried to launch a fishing jacket collection. I worked as a fashion stylist – basically I tried to use all my knowledge of creativity.

I had French girlfriends, but I finally met an English girl from Somerset. I liked French jazz or French vintage music, including Serge Gainsbourg who was with Jane Birkin – and I thought, ‘Oh, an English girl in Paris!’ After 15 years I wanted something more settled and she started talking about the English life. So, we had two babies, and we moved here with our children (now 8 & 6 years old) for a more healthy way of life. And I was very, very excited because for my hobby, fly fishing, this country is great.

I knew about Clarks – only because of Clarks Originals – from when I was working in fashion and was a kid in the 80s. They had Clarks Originals in very good shops. So I said, ‘Clarks – why not?!’ 

I had French girlfriends, but I finally met an English girl from Somerset. I liked French jazz or French vintage music, including Serge Gainsbourg who was with Jane Birkin – and I thought, ‘Oh, an English girl in Paris!’

Can you outline your role at Clarks and some of the projects you have worked on? Which have been your favourites so far…?

My favourite project and one of the biggest was the Clarks Originals re-branding – working on the logo with the team from mood board to execution. For Clarks Originals branding I have now also started using my drawing, so my drawing is visible on the website. I also worked on the Clarks V&A collaboration – I chose the pink and worked on how we use my specially created black and white illustrations for the logo and box design. These projects are exciting as I can put more of my personality into them. Especially after the V&A project people have started to recognise my drawing and have asked me for similar things.

Can you tell us about things in your life and in the outside world or within your job that inspire you?

I was always doing doodles and drawing as a child, and I was always a collector. The first thing I started collecting was vinyl, then when I was a skateboarder in the 80s all the skate T-shirts, like Stüssy.  I saw them before they got very famous. I always enjoyed finding something not many people have. I’m interested in very small, very niche stuff - the small trend. I still collect now. I probably have nearly 100 fishing rods. I have 3000 vinyl records, all French from the 1950s-70s. I like everything vintage. When I was DJ-ing in Paris I found all the vinyl myself from car boot sales in Paris, I was doing the flea markets every single weekend.

When we started working with the V&A we were taken behind the scenes to their archive to talk about what is iconic. I looked at the detail of the building which was all quite fascinating, so I took many pictures and finally did the drawings. I tried to mix the two things – for example, something from Clarks – a last or tools – with something from the V&A building. So it’s a mix of both.

So in your spare time would we find you on the riverbank? Tell us more about your fly fishing expertise?

I started fishing when I was five or six years old – my father would take me to the lake and leave me there then pick me up later. I taught myself to fish. I’m an auto-didact.

Now my fishing rods are always in the boot of my car with my Wellington boots and waders. So sometimes I say to my wife, ‘Oh I need to get something from the supermarket,’ and at the same time I try to go fishing, even for 15-20 minutes. Fly fishing is sort of like therapy for me. Other fishing is just waiting - if nothing happens you get bored – but fly fishing is basically you trying to understand nature all the time. Like learning the wind direction and the temperature of the water, or, if it’s a sunny day today how was it yesterday. So, it’s a very good place to learn something very fundamental.

Sometimes I’ve got problems with my job or my friendships, all sorts of stuff, and I go fishing, and you kind of learn how you work it out. Basically the river is not flat. There are so many things to understand so it is very complicated but I think it is very simple.

And it’s so funny, if you’re stressed you can’t make your knot! If you’re nervous, your fly, the eye is so tiny, you can’t even get that! So I say, ‘Calm down, calm down..I can do it!’ It’s like yoga!

When I was teaching fly-fishing in Paris I had such surprising customers, such a mix – they were from the one and only fishing shop left in Paris. I taught such a mix of people – famous actors, rich people, fashion designers, students – very cosmopolitan. I teach my children to fish sometimes. Their friends say, ‘Your dad’s teaching fly fishing, he’s famous,’ and my kids say, ‘Ooh, Daddy teaches fly fishing, Daddy’s cool!’

I have many pairs of Clarks Originals. And I’ve stopped wearing other shoes. I’ve worn only Originals for maybe the last three years – and they’ve become part of my skin!

Do you have any key looks or style notes from the Clarks AW15 collection?

I’ve grown up with Clarks Originals – Desert Boots, Desert Trek, the Wallabee, Natalie. I absorbed many famous shoes when I was young and I definitely liked Clarks Originals with their authentic, simple designs.

I went to a Clarks Originals photoshoot at Kilve beach which is on the West Somerset Coast Path, and I noticed Kilve Trek.  It has a very outdoors, authentic side with its chunky Vibram sole and felt inside and is maybe more masculine than the classic Desert Trek. Kilve Trek brings things together, it brings in the outdoors.

I have many pairs of Clarks Originals. And I’ve stopped wearing other shoes. I’ve worn only Originals for maybe the last three years – and they’ve become part of my skin!

Photography by Stuart Grimshaw of Pennleigh © Stuart Grimshaw/Pennleigh Ltd. 2015 www.pennleigh.com. Read more about Atsushi's fly fishing adventures here.

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